Multilingual Proficiency and Employment Opportunities for Tibetans: Case Study of Rebgong

Multilingual Proficiency and Employment Opportunities for Tibetans: Case Study of Rebgong

Yumkyi Dolma is a graduate student at the Central Minzu University in Beijing who specializes in education. She has conducted fieldwork on the impact of multilingual education in the northeastern region of Amdo (Qinghai province).  She discussed her ongoing and prospective research on the relationship between multilingual proficiency and employment opportunities for Tibetans in the county of Rebgong (Tongren).  She is currently completing a visiting fellowship at the University of Maryland where she focused her studies on sociolinguistics.

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Film Screening and Discussion: Education for Girls of Minority Nationalities in the PRC – Lahu Case Study in Comparative Context

Film Screening and Discussion: Education for Girls of Minority Nationalities in the PRC – Lahu Case Study in Comparative Context

Film Screening to be followed by discussion led by film-maker Dr. Xing

Teng

Dr. Xing Teng of Central University of Minzu – Tibet Governance Project, Elliott School of International Affairs, Washington DC.

Dr. Xing Teng is a Professor of Education and Anthropology at the Central Minzu University in Beijing. Funded by the Ford Foundation, the film spans a five-year ethnographic case study of girls from the Lahu community along the Mekong/Lancang River on the Burmese border. The film, translated into English as “Lahu Girls’ Expectations: An Anthropological Documentary” tracks the effects of transitioning from a traditional matriarchal society to a globalized context through the formal education system. What were the expectations? What was the outcome? What was the role of education? How did the state school manage the relationship between the state’s agenda and ethnic nationalism in a multilingual society?


China’s Environmental Movement: A View from Beijing

Liu Jianqiang

Liu Jianqiang speaking at the Tibet Governance Project, Elliott School of International Affairs, April 2013

China’s Environmental Movement: A View from Beijing

LiuJianqiang is Beijing Editor of Chinadialogue.net, an online, bilingual forum on environmental issues in China.

Formerly a senior investigative reporter with Southern Weekend, China’s most influential investigative newspaper, he is known for his exposes of the controversial Tiger Leaping Gorge dams in southern Yunnan, genetically modified rice, and the Summer Palace Lake Reconstruction Project, all of which led to shifts in government policy. He has been featured in the Wall Street Journal’s study of investigative journalism in China as well as in China Ink, the Changing Face of Chinese Journalism, and his books include Heavenly Beads: A Tibetan Legend (2009) and The Last Raft on the Jinsha River (2012). Read the rest of this entry »


Panel on the Impact of Chinese Leadership Transition in Tibet

Jigme Ngapo, Tibet specialist, speaking at the Elliott School of International Affairs in Washington DC

Jigme Ngapo, Tibet specialist, speaking at the Elliott School of International Affairs in Washington DC

The Tibet Conundrum and the New Chinese Leadership: Emerging Dynamics after the Leadership Transition in Beijing

Panelists
Jigme Ngapo, Tibet Specialist and Former RFA Tibetan Service Director
Dr. Susette Cooke, Lecturer in China Studies, University of Technology, Sydney
Steven Marshall, Senior Advisor, Congressional Executive Commission on China
Moderator:
Dr. Sean Roberts, Associate Professor of International Affairs Director, International Development Studies

Panel discussion on the impact of China's leadership transition on the question of Tibet - March 2013, Washington DC

Panel discussion on the impact of China’s leadership transition on the question of Tibet – March 2013, Washington DC


Challenges and Opportunities for the Tibetan Administration in Exile: Reflections on a Shifting Political Landscape

Challenges and Opportunities for the Tibetan Administration in Exile: Reflections on a Shifting Political Landscape

Lobsang Nyandak, Official Representative of His Holiness the Dalai Lama to the Americas, Office of Tibet New York

Lobsang Nyandak 2 Mr. Nyandak served as a Cabinet member of the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala from 2001-2006. As a Cabinet member, he headed the Department of Information and International Relations, the Department of Finance and the Department of Health. He also served as a member of the Tibetan Parliament and as the first executive director of the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, one of the premier institutions that track and promote human rights and democracy for Tibetans.


Tibetan Language Policy and Practice as a Challenge of Governance:

Tibetan Language Policy and Practice as a Challenge of Governance: Shifting Minority Policy Orientations in the People’s Republic of China

Manla KyiManla Kyi spoke about China’s changing policy toward minority languages. She will focus on the case of the Tibetan language and policy about the language of instruction in schools. Kyi is a doctoral candidate at the University of Hong Kong.

Manla Kyi is affiliated with the Tibet Governance Program at George Washington University. She is a leading specialist in Tibetan education and language policy issues and was the Co-Chair of the Tibet Governance and Practice (TGAP) Forum on Language Policy and Practice, held in Montréal, Canada in May 2012. Read the rest of this entry »


Rewriting the Medieval History of Tibet: A Field Survey of the Great Tombs and Relics of the Tibetan Empire in the Western Kokonor Region

Rewriting the Medieval History of Tibet:
A Field Survey of the Great Tombs and Relics of the Tibetan Empire in the Western Kokonor Region

Professor Yongdrol K. Tsongkha Yongdrol K. Tsongkha , Professor for Ethnic and Tibetan Studies, Lanzhou University, Research Associate, Indiana University

Since the 1983 discovery of plundered imperial tombs in Dulan in the western Kokonor Region of the Tibetan plateau, thousands of tombs dated to the period of the Tibetan Empire (7-9th centuries) have been discovered in the area. A great number of tomb relics such as gold, silver and silk artifacts and Tibetan inscriptions on stone tablets and wood slats are now circulating in public museums and private collections in Europe, North America, Japan and China as well as in antique markets in Hong Kong, Beijing, Lanzhou and elsewhere. Read the rest of this entry »


Kurdistan Regional Autonomy and the Twentieth Century State

With Prof Bayar Dosky, University of Duhok – Kurdistan, Northern Iraq

On September 27, 2012, Dr. Tashi Rabgey gave a talk on “The Limits of Sovereignty and the Twentieth Century State:  Tibet and the People’s Republic of China” at the University of Duhok in Iraqi Kurdistan.  Dr. Rabgey is a visiting scholar at the Institute for Global and International Studies at the Elliott School of International Affairs.

While traveling in Iraqi Kurdistan last week, I had the opportunity to give a talk at the University of Duhok on the problem of twentieth century statehood. Read the rest of this entry »


Gender equity in Tibetan public affairs

Staff post by Cait O’Donnell

On July, 20, 2012, the Global Gender Program hosted a talk by Dr. B. Tsering, Reagan Fascell Democracy Fellow and Member of Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile, entitled “Gender Equity in Tibetan Public Affairs: New Thoughts on a Democracy in Progress.”

Following opening remarks by Tashi Rabgey, Dr. Tsering began with an overview of the situation of Tibetan women pre-1959 and in Exile. Before 1959, Tibetan women benefited from more equal marriage policies and equality in spiritual practice. However, disadvantages included: low priority for women’s educati0n and political participation, preference towards male children since family lineage was transferred through males, and prohibition of nuns from taking the Geshe Ma (the equivalent of a Ph.D. in Buddhist philosophy) exam. Read the rest of this entry »


Rehearsing the state: Governance without sovereignty among Tibetans in exile

Rehearsing the state: Governance without sovereignty among Tibetans in exile

Fiona McConnellDr. Fiona McConnell

Guest post by Cait O’Donnell

All the world’s a stage. Political geography often adopts theatrical terms such as “actors” and “performance” into its jargon. Using theatrical terms to spotlight the Tibetan government in exile, at a presentation sponsored by the CIGA Seminar Series at the George Washington University, Fiona McConnell delivered a presentation entitled, “Rehearsing the State: The Governance Practices of the Tibetan Government in Exile.” McConnell is a Junior Research Fellow at Trinity College, the University of Cambridge. Read the rest of this entry »